Spring
Webinar Series

April – June, 2021

Small Animal Speakers

David Dycus, DVM, MS, CCRP, DACVS

Nexus Veterinary Specialists

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, April 13, 2021
7:00-9:00 pm

Brace Yourself: Conservative Management and the Role of Orthotics in Cruciate Disease & Hip Dysplasia: Conservative and Rehabilitation Management

Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is a common cause of hind limb lameness. Surgical correction is recommended, but not every owner can afford surgery, and not every dog is a candidate for surgery. This presentation will cover a review of the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology as it relates to CCL rupture. Diagnostic modalities such as palpation (cranial drawer, tibial thrust) will be discussed. Management will be focused on the conservative approach broken down into 2-week blocks to help guide the practitioner in goals for each stage, and what the owner should be doing at home. Also, stifle orthotics have become increasingly popular so time will be spent discussing if orthotics play a role in the management of CCL rupture. Current evidence base, classification, and pros and cons of this new emerging treatment modality will be covered. The information that a practitioner should know when discussing orthotics will be covered in detail. The goals are for the attendee to leave with knowledge in diagnosing CCL rupture, understand the approach and goals of conservative management, and have an understanding of what evidence base exists for stifle orthotics as well as being able to decide on appropriate candidates.

Surgery is commonly recommended for patients with hip dysplasia. But does every patient need surgery? Can every owner afford surgery? There is ample information on the topic of hip dysplasia diagnosis and surgical treatment, but there is paucity of information in the area of conservative management. This presentation provides information on the goals of conservative management and introduces the at home rehabilitation efforts as well as formal rehabilitation therapy as part of the conservative management. The goal is for the veterinarian to gain an understanding into basic rehabilitation concepts they can use in daily practice when conservatively managing patients with hip dysplasia.

Dr. Dycus attended Mississippi State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine for his veterinary degree, Auburn University for a small animal rotating internship, and Mississippi State for a combined surgical residency and Masters degree.  Dr. Dycus is frequently asked to lecture locally, nationally, and internationally. He has given over 200 continuing education lectures and taught over 125 laboratories. He has published numerous research articles and authored or co-authored several book chapters. He is the co-editor of the textbook: Complications in Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Surgery. He was named by DVM360.com as one of the 10 veterinarians to watch in 2018. Dr. Dycus is a frequent contributor for updates in orthopedics to several veterinary websites and magazines. Dr. Dycus has also been featured on Sirius XMs Doctor Radio’s segment on Pet Health and Orthopedics. His passion for teaching has allowed Dr. Dycus to become a laboratory instructor for the CBLO, TPLO, extra-capsular stabilization, medial patella luxation, angular limb deformity, and fracture repair. He is on faculty for AO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), and he is an orthopedic consultant for VIN (Veterinary Information Network).  Along with being a scientific reviewer for multiple journals, he serves on the editorial review board and is the associate editor (orthopedics) for Veterinary Surgery, the official publication of the American and European Colleges of Veterinary Surgeons. He has previously held an appointment on the research committee for the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. Currently Dr. Dycus is on the Board of Trustees for the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and is a council member for the Association for Veterinary Orthopedic Research and Education (AVORE).  Dr. Dycus became a certified canine rehabilitation practitioner through the University of Tennessee in 2015. He is the director and chief of orthopedic surgery at Nexus Veterinary Bone and Joint Center where he has a focus on total joint replacement, complex and minimally invasive fracture repair as well as angular limb deformity correction, 3D implant printing, and arthroscopy. In addition, he is the medical director for Nexus Veterinary Specialists located in Baltimore, Maryland. He is the co-founder and co-director of the Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Institute (VSMRI), an online veterinary rehabilitation learning platform.

 

 

Matthew Keats, DVM, DACVS-SA 

Chesapeake Veterinary Surgical Specialists

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, April 20, 2021
7:00-8:00 pm 

Basic Laparascopy: Indications & Procedures

The purpose of the webinar is to discuss indications and procedures for basic laparoscopy.  Basic laparoscopic set up will be demonstrated. Some videos and pictures of procedures will be included.

Dr. Keats received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He then graduated from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 1999. After graduation he continued his education as a small animal rotating internship at the VCA Berwyn and Franklin Park Animal Hospitals where he received the “Intern of Year” award. The following year, he remained on staff at VCA Berwyn Animal hospital as an Emergency clinician and intern supervisor.  In 2001, he returned to Maryland, where he completed a 1-year small animal surgical internship with Chesapeake Veterinary Surgical Specialists (CVSS) splitting time between the Towson and Annapolis offices. Upon completing, he accepted a surgical residency with CVSS. After completing his residency in 2005, he became board certified in 2006 and remained on staff in the Towson office until the end of 2009.  From the beginning of 2010 until mid-2014, he worked at VCA Veterinary Referral Associates (VRA) in Gaithersburg, MD as a staff surgeon performing both soft-tissue and orthopedic surgery. He was the Intern Director for the intern class of 2013-2014. In July, he transferred to VCA Old Marple in Springfield, Pennsylvania to start a referral surgical service.  Dr. Keats has special interests in trauma and wound reconstruction. He has always preferred to take a whole-body approach to provide his patients with specific, individualized care.  Dr. Keats returned to CVSS’ Towson office full-time in the fall of 2015. In the fall of 2016 CVSS opened an office in Columbia, which is where Dr. Keats is now based.

Benoit Clerc-Renault, VMD, MS, DACVR

Veterinary Referral Associates

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, April 20, 2021
8:00-9:00 pm 

Radiation for Inoperable Tumors

This lecture introduces radiation as a treatment option for non-surgical tumors. Common tumor types and locations in dogs and cats where radiation can benefit patients will be presented using case examples.

Dr. Clerc-Renaud completed his Bachelor of Science majoring in Physiology at McGill University then went on to receive his doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from the University of Pennsylvania. After completing both a rotating and a specialized oncology internship, Dr. Clerc-Renaud finished his residency in radiation oncology at Colorado State University where he also earned a master’s degree. His professional interests include new and alternative ways to treat cancer with cutting edge technology such as stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) and using liquid fiducial markers to identify tumors. In his free time, Dr. Clerc-Renaud loves tennis, traveling, and spending time with his cat, Miles.

Frederic Jacob, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine)

Atlantic Veterinary Internal Medicine & Oncology

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, April 27, 2021
7:00-9:00 pm

Bloody Urine & Minimally-Invasive Intervention for Stone Disease in Dogs

During this presentation, Dr. Jacob will cover a diagnostic approach to 3 unusual cases of hematuria in dogs.
Medical and minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of cystoliths in dogs will be addressed in this presentation.

Dr. Jacob earned his DVM degree from the University of Montreal in 1995. He interned at Washington State University, and carried out his residency and received his PhD at the University of Minnesota. He and his wife, Kristin Jacob, a cardiologist with CVCA, have twin sons, and a dog named Rico. When he’s not at work, he enjoys running, biking, and traveling.

Michael Schaer, DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC 

University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, May 4, 2021
7:00-9:00 pm 

Feline Medicine Case Rounds

This interactive 2-hour presentation will focus on a series of challenging  feline medicine disorders covering a variety of topics including fluid and electrolyte disorders, diabetes mellitus, aldosteronoma, and pit viper envenomation.  Many take home messages will be included in these discussions.

Dr. Michael Schaer is currently at  the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine where he is Professor Emeritus and Adjunct Professor in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine.  He is board certified in internal medicine (ACVIM) and emergency and critical care (ACVECC).He has published several papers and book chapters and he has lectured nationally and internationally. Dr Schaer is also the author of four textbooks: Clinical Medicine of the Dog and Cat – 1st , 2nd , and 3rd editions and Clinical Signs in Small Animal Medicine, 1st and 2nd editions.

Amelia White, DVM, MS, DACVD

Auburn University

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, May 11, 2021
7:00-9:00 pm 

It’s Canine MRSP Again, Now What? & Tips for Managing Feline Otitis

The first lecture will receive recognition of the three types of pyoderma and clues indicating the presence of antibiotic resistant infections.  Antibiotic selection and use of topical therapy to improve healing and reduce infection recurrence will be presented through the use of several complicated pyoderma cases.

Managing ear inflammation and infections in cats is challenging.  This lecture will review the basic reasons cats develop otitis and approaches to medical and surgical treatments.

Dr. Amelia White received her DVM from the University of Georgia in 2010 followed by a one-year rotating internship in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery at Auburn University.  She completed a three-year Dermatology residency and Master’s degree at the University of Illinois in 2014.  Dr. White became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology in 2014, and is currently an Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology at Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine.  She has authored or contributed to various abstracts, case reports, primary research, and book chapters.  She teaches the communications skills course at Auburn University, and her interests include allergic skin and ear diseases, infectious diseases, and student mental health and wellbeing.

Claire Weigand, DVM, DACVIM-SA

Veterinary Specialty Center of Sturbridge

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, May 18, 2021
7:00-9:00 pm 

Protein Losing Enteropathy & Protein Losing Nephropathy

A review of two conditions commonly causing hypoalbuminemia.  Pathophysiology, clinical signs, diagnostic options, with dietary and medical management will be discussed.

Dr. Claire Weigand graduated from Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1991.  She completed a small animal rotating internship at Purdue University before returning to Auburn University for an Internal Medicine Residency.  Following this, she did a sabbatical position at Atlantic Veterinary College, then was an assistant professor at Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine.  She transitioned to private practice in 1999, where she still enjoys the daily challenges of managing chronic diseases, and the relationships she forges with her patients and clients.  Dr. Weigand is Board Certified in Small Animal Internal Medicine.  She has a particular interest in Urology, Gastroenterology, and Immune mediated diseases.

Tanya Tag, DVM, DACVECC

Pet+ER

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, May 25, 2021
7:00-8:00 pm

Small Animal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

A review of small animal CPR derived from the guidelines created in the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER).  There is more emphasis on basic CPR, staff roles, and intra arrest monitoring in the lecture with a brief overview of advanced CPR.

Dr. Tanya Tag (she/ her/ hers) is currently the Medical Direct and a part owner of the Pet+ER in Towson and Columbia.  She was born and raise around Towson, MD before going to Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY to obtain her Bachelor of Science.  She graduated from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine with her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 2001.  She became a diplomat of the American College of Emergency and Critical Care in 2011 after completing a residency in emergency and critical care under the direction of Dr. Thomas Day.  It is with Dr. Day that she published, “Electrocardiographic assessment of hyperkalemia in dogs and cats” in JVECC.  Her current professional interests include small animal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, anesthesia, respiratory cases, and veterinary mentorship/training.  When Dr. Tag is not working, she enjoys spending time with her husband, Rene’, two kids, and their many pets (dogs, cats, chickens, ponies, horses, bees, and bunny).

Notosha Richardson, DVM

Pet+ER

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, May 25, 2021
8:00-9:00 pm

Approach to the Yellow Cat

A summary of the most common causes of hepatobiliary disease and hyperbilirubinemia in feline patients will be presented.  This will include a brief summary of pathophysiology, general approach to diagnostic work-up for hepatobiliary disease in feline patients and options for referral and in-hospital management.  This lecture will include a strong focus on hepatic lipidosis, extra-hepatic biliary obstruction, and cholangitis.

Natosha Richardson is currently practicing as a Residency Trained Emergency and Critical Care Specialist with Pet+ER. She graduated from Royal Veterinary College in 2015, completing a rotating internship in 2016 and ECC Residency in 2019. Dr. Richardson’s clinical interests include polytrauma and acute kidney injury. When not working, Dr. Richardson enjoys spending time outside hiking, working out and traveling (pre-COVID). Dr. Richardson resides in White Marsh with her husband, two cats Ralph and George, and two Dogs, Spectre and Gryff.

David Crum, DVM, MPH

Maryland State Public Health Veterinarian

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
7:00-8:00 pm 

Rabies 101:  What You Need to Know

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of all mammals and is transmitted primarily via the bite of an infected animal.  To date in 2021, 23 animals have been confirmed with rabies in Maryland, and 251 rabid animals were reported in 2020. While raccoons and other wildlife account for the majority of these, it is important to remember that dogs, cats, and other companion animals may be at risk of rabies as well. The veterinary community plays a vital role in protecting these vulnerable populations.  This lecture will provide a review of basic rabies principles, including rabies epidemiology, transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis and will highlight frequently asked questions from veterinary professionals.  Relevant rabies resources for the practicing veterinarian will also be provided.

David Crum graduated from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2002 and practiced avian and exotic animal medicine in Northern Virginia for over 13 years. In 2016, he completed his Master of Public Health from George Mason University and made the transition from clinical veterinary practice to a career in public health.  Dr. Crum started his public health career with Fairfax County Health Department’s Division of Environmental Health in Fairfax, Virginia. While there, he was involved with the Consumer Protection and Disease Carrying Insects programs and helped with the development of enhanced mosquito surveillance and control practices. He joined the Center for Zoonotic and Vector-borne Diseases at the Maryland Department of Health in 2017 and assumed the role of  State Public Health Veterinarian in 2018.  His interests include tick borne diseases and the promotion of the ONE Health concept, highlighting the relationship between human and animal health.

Rebecca Krimins, DVM, MS

Veterinary Clinical Trials Network at Johns Hopkins University

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
8:00-9:00 pm 

Narcotics Compliance Training: What Every Veterinarian Needs to Know

This 60-minute lecture will review regulatory compliance on the use and dispensing of controlled substances by veterinarians in the state of Maryland.  This includes a review of the Controlled Substance Act (CSA), Code of Federal Regulations and DEA compliance requirements for the state of Maryland.  Record keeping and security accountability, oversight of staff handling controlled drugs, proactive measures that can be taken to reduce opportunities for controlled substance diversion and more will be examined.  A short discussion will follow the lecture where we will ask participants to share personal experiences on methods that have worked and not worked, in their clinics.

Dr. Rebecca A. Krimins is an Assistant Professor in the Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and a board-eligible veterinary anesthesiologist. A native of Annapolis, Maryland, Dr. Krimins completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Chicago, and received her veterinary degree from Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine.  Dr. Krimins completed two internships, a one-year small animal rotating internship at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan followed by a one-year surgical internship at Western Veterinary Specialist Centre, Calgary, Alberta. Dr. Krimins worked in private practice as a general practitioner in Hoboken, New Jersey.  This time in general practice greatly enhanced Dr. Krimins’ knowledge of the demands on GPs.  She then completed a three-year veterinary anesthesia and analgesia residency at the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine while also receiving a Master’s of Science degree in Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Dr. Krimins has more than 15 years of experience in managing critically ill patients during advanced imaging procedures and conducting cutting-edge clinical studies. Dr. Krimins’ specialty in veterinary anesthesia, sedation and pain management in combination with her experience in directing advanced clinical research offers each veterinary patient the best opportunities for diagnosis and therapy. As founder and Director of The Veterinary Clinical Trials Network at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Krimins has built a revolutionary center designed to leverage the expertise and platforms available at Johns Hopkins University in order to transform newly discovered diagnostics and therapeutics into real-life practical approaches that benefit veterinary patients. Dr. Krimins newest textbook Learning from Disease in Pets, A One Health Model for Discovery was published in the fall of 2020.

Matthew Keats, DVM, DACVS-SA & Fredric Jacob, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Chesapeake Veterinary Surgical Specialists & Atlantic Veterinary Internal Medicine & Oncology

Sponsored by:

Tuesday, June 8, 2021
7:00-9:00 pm 

Canine Urinary Incontinence: A New Approach to an Old Problem & Medical and Surgical Approach to Benign Ureteral Obstruction in Cats

The first lecture will focus on medical, interventional endourologic and surgical techniques when dealing with canine urinary incontinence.  The second lecture will provide insights in terms of medical treatment when dealing with ureteral obstruction in cats but the major focus of the presentation will be discussing surgical interventions for this complex issue

Dr. Keats received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He then graduated from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 1999. After graduation he continued his education as a small animal rotating internship at the VCA Berwyn and Franklin Park Animal Hospitals where he received the “Intern of Year” award. The following year, he remained on staff at VCA Berwyn Animal hospital as an Emergency clinician and intern supervisor.  In 2001, he returned to Maryland, where he completed a 1-year small animal surgical internship with Chesapeake Veterinary Surgical Specialists (CVSS) splitting time between the Towson and Annapolis offices. Upon completing, he accepted a surgical residency with CVSS. After completing his residency in 2005, he became board certified in 2006 and remained on staff in the Towson office until the end of 2009.  From the beginning of 2010 until mid-2014, he worked at VCA Veterinary Referral Associates (VRA) in Gaithersburg, MD as a staff surgeon performing both soft-tissue and orthopedic surgery. He was the Intern Director for the intern class of 2013-2014. In July, he transferred to VCA Old Marple in Springfield, Pennsylvania to start a referral surgical service.  Dr. Keats has special interests in trauma and wound reconstruction. He has always preferred to take a whole-body approach to provide his patients with specific, individualized care.  Dr. Keats returned to CVSS’ Towson office full-time in the fall of 2015. In the fall of 2016 CVSS opened an office in Columbia, which is where Dr. Keats is now based.

Dr. Jacob earned his DVM degree from the University of Montreal in 1995. He interned at Washington State University, and carried out his residency and received his PhD at the University of Minnesota. He and his wife, Kristin Jacob, a cardiologist with CVCA, have twin sons, and a dog named Rico. When he’s not at work, he enjoys running, biking, and traveling.

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