Veterinary Point
of Care Ultrasound
for Everyday Practice

Sunday, October 17, 2021

MDVMA looks forward to hosting a hands-on wet-lab to help practitioners enhance their skills when performing ultrasound in their practice.

This event is generously sponsored by Fujifilm Sonosite.

8.0 hours RACE-approved credit

Presenters

Soren Boysen, DVM

Dr. Soren Boysen obtained his DVM from the University of Saskatchewan, completed a small animal internship at the Atlantic Veterinary College, and a residency at Tufts University, becoming a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care in 2003. He is the former Chief of Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care at the University of Montreal and currently a Full Professor of at the University of Calgary.  A member of several ECVECC, ACVECC and VetCOT committees he continues to actively promote the global advancement of veterinary ECC. Extensively published (more than 80 papers/chapters), and a recipient of numerous teaching and research excellence awards, he has become an internationally recognized speaker. He and his colleagues from Tufts changed the practice of veterinary medicine when they developed and introduced the profession to FAST exams, and with colleagues at the University of Calgary, adapted veterinary point of care ultrasound for use in non-trauma patients. With the help of many great colleagues from around the world, he continues to develop ultrasound training techniques and workshops for non-specialist practitioners. Along with point of care ultrasound, his research interests include hemorrhage, coagulation, and perfusion. Although he frequently speaks at national/international conventions across the globe, he also enjoys delivering personalize continuing education at local clinics.

Serge Chalhoub, DVM

Dr. Chalhoub graduated from the DVM program at the Faculté de médecine vétérinaire (FMV) of the Université de Montréal in 2004. Serge followed this with a one-year rotating small animal clinical internship at the same institution. After working for two years as a general practitioner and emergency veterinarian in Montreal, he pursued a residency in small animal internal medicine at the Animal Medical Center (AMC) in New York City. Once his residency completed in 2009 he stayed on at the AMC as their first renal/hemodialysis fellow and then as a staff doctor. Dr. Chalhoub has been a faculty member at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) since 2012. He is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the 2015 University of Calgary Team Teacher of the Year Award with his colleague Dr. Søren Boysen. He has authored and co-authored numerous scientific articles and book chapters on veterinary point of care ultrasound, renal and urinary medicine, and lectures at numerous conferences on these topics.

Event Schedule

[ Sunday, October 17 • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm ]

7:30 – 8:00 am

Check In & Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 10:00 am

Part 1: How to Ultrasound the Pleural Space and Lung  

Ever struggle with determining the cause of dyspnea in a cat that is too unstable to take radiographs or draw blood for ProBNP levels (cardiac, respiratory, pleural effusion)? Ever debate if you should discontinue IV fluids in the patient with mild tachypnea? Have you ever felt frustration at not finding a cause for patients presenting for “ain’t doing right” with no specific clinical signs? Veterinary point of care ultrasound (VPOCUS) can help you manage these patients! Using a binary approach to ask the right question at the right time makes learning and applying pleural space and lung ultrasound easy! VPOCUS techniques are rapid, easy-to-learn and practical ultrasound skills that ANY practitioner can apply in every day practice. This interactive, banter filled co-lecture (by an internist and a criticalist that rarely agree on anything) will cover the core principles to understand and interpret sonographic findings of the pleural space and lung. Following a binary approach, the key principles of the bat sign, gator sign, glide sign, A lines, B lines, lung pulse, and curtain sign, dry lung and wet lung will be covered: These are all things that can be used by general practitioners in every day practice. If you own an ultrasound machine, there is no excuse to not apply these principles on a daily basis!

 

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Part 2: Paradigm Shifts in Diagnosing Pneumothorax, Pleural Effusion and Lung Pathology with Point-of-Care Ultrasound

Recent studies have demonstrated very poor to moderate agreement between Thoracic Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (T-FAST) protocols and CT scans when it comes to diagnosis pleural effusion and pneumothorax, and to some extent, lung pathology. This should not be the case! Using a binary approach, assessing the patient and asking the right clinical question based on clinical findings increases diagnostic accuracy, and makes point of care ultrasound rapid and easy to learn! This lecture, which will again be a banter filled co-lecture by a small animal internist (always has 100 diagnoses for every problem) and a small animal criticalist (rarely believes the internist is correct), will focus on a practical approach to point of care ultrasound that considers clinical findings and challenges current protocols by asking the question; “where will pathology accumulate” and subsequently, “what should we be sonographically looking for to answer binary, relevant, rapid, clinical, and often lifesaving questions”. Don’t simply put the probe on the patient or expect a “one protocol fits all” approach to be applicable to all situations; ask the right question and know how to modify protocols to increase the chance of success with pleural space and lung pathology!

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Lunch

1:00 – 3:00 pm

Part 3: Point-of-Care Abdominal Ultrasound for Everyday Practice

Ever wonder if the cat that ate lilies is producing urine when it’s not possible to pass a urinary catheter? Ever wonder if the dog with an acute abdomen has free abdominal air in the abdomen, or if the post-operative patient that is not eating has ileus? Using a binary approach to ask the right question at the right time makes learning and applying abdominal point of care ultrasound easy! VPOCUS techniques are rapid, easy-to-learn and practical ultrasound skills that ANY practitioner can apply in every day practice. This is the third of 4 banter filled co-lectures by a criticalist (that thinks he knows the answers) and an internist (that might be correct some of the time) will cover the core principles to understand and interpret sonographic findings of abdominal ultrasound including the identification of free fluid, urine production, GI motility, free abdominal air and the gall bladder halo sign. All clinically relevant questions when asked at the right time, in a binary fashion, based on patient assessment!

3:00 – 5:00 pm

Part 4: Cardiovascular Ultrasound Made Easy

A patient presents collapsed, it has poor pulses and a prolonged capillary refill time – it is in cardiovascular shock! (The internist runs away). Should an IV fluid bolus be given, and if so, how much and how will the patient likely respond to IV fluid therapy (The criticalist is super excited)? Ever struggle with deciding if the dyspneic cat or dog should receive furosemide for possible congestive heart failure or wonder if maybe steroid administration for feline asthma would be more appropriate? What about differentiating pericardial effusion from dilated cardiomyopathy on thoracic radiographs, or trying to decide if that fluid seen on ultrasound is pleural or pericardial? Ultrasound can help! This, the last co-lecture (if you make it this far with the contrasting approaches of a criticalist and an internist) will build on each prior lecture and continue the binary approach to answering clinically relevant and appropriate questions to ask. The best part of VPOCUS is that you do not have to be a cardiologist or radiologist to perform these techniques! The principles of cardiac anatomy with an emphasis on the key cardiac windows to assess (there are 3 that answer most clinically relevant questions), being able to confidently identify pericardial effusion, and assessing IV volume status will be presented. One last question: have you ever struggled to place an IV catheter in a patient that is dehydrated, has hematomas, thick skin or edema? You guessed it, ultrasound can help, and we will show you how!

Location

Blue Pearl Pet Hospital
1 Taft Court, Rockville, MD

*masks are optional for vaccinated individuals;
masks are required for unvaccinated individuals

Pricing

  • MDVMA Member Veterinarian

  • $349/mo
  • Registration Includes:
    6 hours continuing education credit
    Continental breakfast, beverages, and lunch
    Hands-on instruction

  • Non-Member Veterinarian

  • $549/mo
  • Registration Includes:
    6 hours continuing education credit
    Continental breakfast, beverages, and lunch
    Hands-on instruction
    MDVMA membership (through June 1, 2022)
X
X