18 Hours of CE / March 25 – 26

Conference Speakers

Andrew Austin

DVM
Cargill Animal Nutrition

Sponsored by:

Thursday, March 25

Dairy Records 1.0 (DC305)

This presentation will provide instruction in applied functionality of DC 305 to assist veterinarians in acquiring information from records to help solve a variety of commonly encountered questions or problems as well as routine monitoring.

Andy Austin graduated from Virginia Tech in 1984 with a B.S. in Animal Science and in 1989 with a DVM from Virginia Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. He joined a large animal veterinary practice in Rock Mount, Va. and practiced there for 3 years before moving to Greenwich, New York in 1992 and joining Battenkill Veterinary Bovine where he practiced for 15 years as a partner before moving to Cargill. In 2012, he became a Cargill employee and moved to Canandaigua, NY to serve as a dairy specialist in western and central NY. He currently is part of the dairy technical services team that works with Cargill dairy focus consultants providing technical support. His work currently focuses on records analysis, worker training, mastitis prevention and milk quality, prefresh and fresh cow housing, calf barn ventilation, and general dairy consulting.

R. Tom Bass, II

DVM, PhD
Renaissance Nutrition, Inc.

Thursday, March 25

Panel Discussion: VFD’s: The First 4 Years

A look at the rollout of VFDs from the perspective of the FDA, a feed company technical services veterinarian fulfilling VFDs and a practicing veterinarian writing VFDs.

Dr. Tom Bass has worked for Renaissance Nutrition, Inc. since April of 2000, where his job responsibilities include veterinary and nutritional technical service and support to Renaissance clients, nutritionists and managers in its service areas across 34 states and Ontario, Canada. He received BS degrees in Animal Science and Biology from Virginia Tech, and his doctorate in veterinary medicine (DVM) from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. Following this, he went on to complete his residency in large animal clinical nutrition at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine and completed his PhD in nutrition at the same institution. His dissertation research focused on vitamin E supplementation in cattle during late gestation. Tom resides in central Pennsylvania with his wife, Elizabeth, and their three children – Braden, Caroline and Garrett.

Jeffrey Bewley

PhD, PAS
Holstein Association USA

Sponsored by:

Friday, March 26

Bedded Pack Barn Management

In this presentation, we will cover strategies for building and managing compost bedded pack barns for dairy farms.

Changing the Game with Dairy Analytics

In this presentation, we will talk about what we can learn from the sports world about how to use data for the dairy industry.

Dr. Jeffrey Bewley is from Rineyville, Kentucky where he grew up working on his grandfather’s dairy farm. He received a B.S. in Animal Sciences (dairy option) from the University of Kentucky in 1998. In 2000, he completed his M.S. in Dairy Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison under the direction of Dr. Roger Palmer with a focus on dairy modernization. His PhD work under Dr. Mike Schutz at Purdue University focused on the application and economics of Precision Dairy Farming technologies. For 9.5 years, Jeffrey was on the faculty at the University of Kentucky as an Extension Dairy Specialist. He has also worked with IceRobotics, PerforMix Nutrition, BoviSync, and Alltech. Dr. Bewley is currently Dairy Analytics and Innovation Scientist with Holstein Association USA. Jeffrey’s professional interests include Precision Dairy Monitoring Technologies, Dairy Records Management and Analytics, Dairy Cattle Genetics and Genomics, Economic Decision Support, Animal Health Economics, Compost Bedded Pack Barn Management and Construction, Freestall Barn Management and Construction, Mastitis Management and Prevention, and Dairy Farm Financial Analysis. Jeffrey Bewley received the American Dairy Science Association Foundation Scholar Award in Production and American Dairy Science Association Cargill Animal Nutrition Young Scientist Awards in 2015. He was named to the Vance Publishing 40 Under 40 for Agriculture Award in 2014. He has secured over 7.5 million dollars in funding during his research career. He has published over 50 peer reviewed publications, 110 meeting abstracts, and 50 industry magazine publications. He has delivered over 100 invited presentations around the world. He is an active member of the American Dairy Science Association and the National Mastitis Council. Dr. Bewley is also a certified CowSignals trainer, a MEX udder health coach, and a Lean Farming trainer. Jeffrey pursues his passion for dairy cattle genetics as a partner in IceBlue Genetics and Fit Genetics. He serves on the advisory boards of multiple dairy technology companies.

John Currin

DVM
Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine

Thursday, March 25

Panel Discussion: VFD’s: The First 4 Years

A look at the rollout of VFDs from the perspective of the FDA, a feed company technical services veterinarian fulfilling VFDs and a practicing veterinarian writing VFDs.

Dr. Currin grew up on a small beef cattle farm in Southwest Virginia. He graduated from VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 1993 and worked as an associate veterinarian in a mixed animal practice for 1 year. He then became a partner in a large animal practice for 3 years, followed by a position as Clinical Professor at VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine for 10 years. Dr. Currin is currently Associate Clinical Professor in Production Management Medicine and Extension Veterinarian. His interests include beef and dairy production medicine, dairy records, dairy and beef reproduction, bovine respiratory disease complex, and bovine pharmacology.

Kevin Dhuyvetter

PhD
Elanco Animal Health

Sponsored by:

Thursday, March 25

Cow Culling and Breeding Decisions in Era of Extra Pregnancies

This session will discuss some general economic principles and then demonstrate how they apply to the dairy industry and specifically to cow culling and breeding decisions.

Kevin Dhuyvetter, PhD, is a Technical Consultant for Elanco Animal Health’s U.S. Dairy Business Unit with responsibility for providing technical support to U.S. dairy producers and key influencers on economic-related issues in the dairy industry. His primary focus is to analyze factors affecting profitability of dairy operations, developing decision tools, and analyzing herd health, production, and economic data. Prior to joining Elanco in June of 2014, Kevin spent approximately 27 years with Kansas State University working as an Extension specialist and research economist. As a professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University, he focused on leasing and buying land, machinery costs, crop and livestock production economics, marketing, and technology adoption. In addition to authoring numerous publications, Kevin developed many decision tools for evaluating the economics of crop and livestock production and marketing issues. He resides in Manhattan, KS, with his wife, Elaine, and they have three grown children.

Ronald Erskine

DVM, PhD
Michigan State University

Friday, March 26

BLV Update

As herd health advisors, veterinarians need to develop management interventions to control BLV in client dairy herds. This seminar will address the practical science of BLV for practitioners, who then will be able to: 1) communicate the impact of BLV on the health of affected cattle, and on the bottom-line of a dairy operation, 2) establish BLV-monitoring within a herd, especially for “super-shedders”, and 3) discern the realities of compliance of BLV-control protocols, including farm labor, to evaluate herd-specific interventions.

Dr. Erskine completed his DVM at the University of Illinois in 1981. Following private practice in Pennsylvania, he gained his Ph.D. at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Erskine has recently retired from the faculty at Michigan State University and served as a Professor and Dairy Extension Veterinarian in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Marie-Eve Fecteau

DVM, DACVIM-LA
New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Friday, March 26

Orthopedic Problems in Cattle

In this hour, we will review clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for some of the most common orthopedic problems in adult cattle and calves. Topics will include septic arthritis, common long-bone fractures and luxations, and other soft tissue traumatic injuries.

Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau is an Associate Professor of Farm Animal Medicine and Surgery in the Department of Clinical Studies-New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Fecteau received her veterinary degree from the Université de Montréal (Canada) in 1999 and subsequently completed a large animal rotating internship at the same institution. Dr. Fecteau then completed a Large Animal Internal Medicine-Food Animal Emphasis residency program at the School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of California-Davis and became a diplomate of the college in 2004. In 2004, Dr. Fecteau joined the PennVet Faculty as a Farm Animal Medicine and Surgery specialist. Dr. Fecteau’s research interests are centered on the pathophysiology and prevention of paratuberculosis in cattle and other ruminants.

Robert Fry

DVM
Cargill Animal Nutrition Group

Thursday, March 25

Dairy Records 1.0 (DART)

Effective utilization of the PCDart records management system for veterinary practitioners engaged in herd health and production management services for dairy producers will be discussed.

After graduating from the University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine in 1977, Dr. Fry began a bovine veterinary practice on the Delmarva Peninsula. His career interest has always centered on production, nutrition and the wellness of dairy cows. Currently he serves as a dairy technical advisor to the Cargill Animal Nutrition group.

Thomas Geary

PhD
USDA-ARS, Fort Keogh

Thursday, March 25

Bull BSE for the 21st Century – Beyond the Traditional BSE

New measures of bull fertility and thoughts toward enhancing the traditional Breeding Soundness Evaluation that might allow quantitative assessment or ranking of bull fertility will be discussed.

Dr. Geary was raised in Western Montana, obtained his BS in Animal Science at Montana State University, MS & PhD at Washington State University, and served as an Assistant Professor in the Animal Science Department at Colorado State University before joining the USDA-ARS, Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in 1999. His research focus has included estrus/ovulation synchronization, factors affecting embryonic mortality, and novel measures of bull/sperm fertility.

Jay Giesy, PhD

Cargill Animal Nutrition

Sponsored by:

Thursday, March 25

Dairy Records 1.0 (DC305)

This presentation will provide instruction in applied functionality of DC 305 to assist veterinarians in acquiring information from records to help solve a variety of commonly encountered questions or problems as well as routine monitoring.

Jay Giesy is US Dairy Technical Services and Nutrition Lead for Cargill Animal Nutrition & Health.  Jay is based in Trumansburg, New York, where he has provided nutrition and management support to Cargill dairy consultants and customers for over 20 years.  During his youth, Jay’s family operated a small registered Holstein dairy which led to his collegiate focus in Dairy Science.  Jay earned a B.S. in Dairy Science from the University of Florida, followed by an M.S. studying hypocalcemia, and a Ph.D. focused upon aspects affecting milk composition, from the University of Idaho.

Sandra Godden

DVM, DVSc
University of Minnesota

Thursday, March 25

Updates on Colostrum Management on Dairies

We will review basic principles plus recent advancements in colostrum management for dairy farms. Among other things, we’ll discuss new standards for monitoring transfer of passive immunity on dairy farms and benefits from feeding colostrum or transition milk post-gut closure.

Dr. Godden is a 1993 graduate of the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. After working for two years as an associate veterinarian in mixed practice in Eastern Ontario, she returned to Guelph to complete a DVSc degree specializing in dairy production medicine. From 1998 to present she has been a member of the Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, University of Minnesota where she is involved with professional student teaching, applied research and outreach activities in dairy production medicine. Sandra is a past president of the National Mastitis Council. Her major academic interests currently include applied research in mastitis control, colostrum and calf health management.

Meredyth Jones

DVM, MS, DACVIM
Oklahoma State University

Thursday, March 25

Urinary Calculi Prevention and Treatment

The fact that they are so hard to treat, coupled with the fact that they only seem to present at 4:30pm on a Friday, make the urolith-blocked sheep or goat very frustrating. This session will outline a diagnostic approach that gets to prognosis and treatment options quickly while making the best use of owner finances. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment options will also be reviewed, along with short and long-term expectations. We will also cover some principles of prevention.

Dr. Jones received her DVM from Oklahoma State University in 2002. She entered private mixed-animal practice in Brandenburg, Kentucky, later completing a residency in Large Animal Internal Medicine-Emphasis Food Animal and received a MS degree in Veterinary Biomedical Sciences at Oklahoma State University. She then taught food animal field services at Kansas State and Texas A&M. She is the owner of Large Animal Consulting & Education, an online continuing education company. She joined the food animal faculty at Oklahoma State in the fall of 2018.

Kevin Lahmers

DVM, PhD, DACVP
Virginia Tech

Thursday, March 25

Emerging Diseases in the Mid-Atlantic: Theileria and Anaplasmosis

Theileria orientalis Ikeda is an emerging disease clinically similar to Anaplasma marginale and spread by the invasive Asian Longhorned tick. Dr. Lahmers will discuss recent developments in tracking this disease.

Dr. Kevin Lahmers is a boarded veterinary pathologist who did his PhD on immune responses of cattle to Anaplasma marginale. For the last 7 years, he has worked at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine where he was the first to identify the Asian Longhorned tick in Virginia and the Ikeda strain of the bovine pathogen, Theileria orientalis.

Bob Larson

DVM, PhD, DACT, DACVPM-Epi, DACAN
Kansas State University

Friday, March 26

New Thoughts on Beef Herd Health Protocols

Protecting the health of beef cattle herds must be addressed with a systematic approach that primarily focuses on protecting pregnant cows from pregnancy loss and protecting young calves from the risks of scours and pneumonia.

Dr. Larson received his DVM from Kansas State in 1987 and a PhD from the KSU Department of Animal Sciences in 1992. He spent five years in private practice and then 10 years at the University of Missouri. In 2006 he returned to K-State where his teaching and research focuses on beef cattle production and health. Dr. Larson’s primary area of interest is the integration of animal health, production efficiency, and economic considerations in beef cattle production.

Paula Menzies

DVM, MPVM, DipECSRHM
University of Guelph

Friday, March 26

Getting More Familiar with Small Ruminant Diseases: Scrapie, OPP, Paratuberculosis, and Orf

There are many diseases that affect adult small ruminants and cause loss of condition and death. This presentation will cover two of these diseases that are very common in sheep and goats – small ruminant lentiviral diseases, specifically OPP (sheep) and CAE (goats), and paratuberculosis or Johne’s disease. I will also review scrapie – although rare, it is very important to recognize. Finally, I will review a common disease of lambs and kids – orf (soremouth).

Paula Menzies has been involved in small ruminant health management for over four decades. She obtained her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, and post graduate training at the University of Saskatchewan and University of California – Davis. After spending a year in private practice in Nova Scotia, she returned to OVC, University of Guelph as a faculty member and as part of the Ruminant Field Service group. She is a Diplomate in the European College of Small Ruminant Health Management, is Secretary-Treasurer of the International Sheep Veterinary Association and is a Board Member of the International Goat Association, as well as serving as de facto member of the Canadian Small Ruminant Veterinarians / Veterinaries des Petits Ruminants du Canada. She is also a member of the Advisory Committee for the UN FAO-OIE Peste des Petits Ruminants Global Eradication Program, whose goal it is to eradicate this viral disease of sheep and goats from the world by 2030. She has won several awards for her role as a small ruminant veterinary practitioner and researcher in recent years and continues to serve on many committees and write research and continuing education articles on sheep and goat health. For further information, CLICK HERE.

Dragan Momcilovic

DVM, PhD
FDA Office of Surveillance and Compliance

Thursday, March 25

Panel Discussion: VFD’s: The First 4 Years

A look at the rollout of VFDs from the perspective of the FDA, a feed company technical services veterinarian fulfilling VFDs and a practicing veterinarian writing VFDs.

Dr. Momcilovic has been the Medicated Feed Specialist for the Center of Veterinary Medicine at the FDA since 1999 and handles labeling and regulatory issues related to veterinary feed directive (VFD) drugs.

Theresa Ollivett

DVM, PhD, DACVIM
University of Wisconsin

Friday, March 26

Use of Ultrasound for Early BRD Diagnosis

This lecture will highlight the rationale for implementing calf lung ultrasound at the herd and individual levels.  The 4 tenets of #WeanClean will be discussed as well as how to implement lung ultrasound on the farm.  Lastly, lung anatomy, ultrasound technique, and ultrasound images and loops will be reviewed.

Dr. Ollivett is a veterinary epidemiologist and board-certified large animal internist. After graduating from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University in 2004, Dr. Ollivett practiced in a predominantly mixed large animal clinic in northern NY. She returned to Cornell University in 2007 and completed a residency in Large Animal Medicine between 2008-2011. In 2014, she completed her doctoral studies at the University of Guelph by validating portable lung ultrasound as a means of diagnosing respiratory disease in dairy calves. As an assistant professor in the Food Animal Production Medicine section at the School of Veterinary Medicine at UW-Madison, Dr. Ollivett works to advance the academic, veterinary and professional dairy industry’s awareness and understanding of lung ultrasound as a means to monitor preweaned calf lung health and promote a #WeanClean™ philosophy on dairy farms.

William Dee Whittier

DVM

Thursday, March 25

Bull Breeding Problems: What I’ve Seen in My Career

You can read the book, but 40 years of doing BSE’s, working with bull test stations and involvement with large beef cattle operations teaches some things about bulls you don’t find in the book.

William Dee Whittier, DVM, MS retired as a Professor from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 2016 after 37 years of service. During his tenure at VA Tech he was the Extension Veterinarian for cattle, a teacher in the Production Management Medicine group, lectured in herd health and theriogenology, and conducted research in reproduction and parasitology.

Anne Zajac

DVM, PhD, DACVM (Parasitology)
Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine

Friday, March 26

Current and Future Solutions to Small Ruminant Parasites and Drug Resistance

This presentation will cover what still works for parasite control in small ruminants plus some newer options and a possible paraprobiotic for future parasite control.

Dr. Anne Zajac received MS and DVM degrees from Michigan State University and a PhD from Ohio State University. In February, 2021 she retired from the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. During her 35-year career at Virginia Tech, Dr. Zajac taught parasitology to veterinary, undergraduate and graduate students and supervised the parasitology diagnostic lab of the veterinary teaching hospital. Her principal and continuing research interest has been gastrointestinal parasites of grazing animals, especially small ruminants. Dr. Zajac is a member of the American Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control (ACSRPC). She is a past president of the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists, and charter diplomate of the parasitology specialty in the American College of Veterinary Microbiology.

X
X